Annual Meeting elects three directors, hears Fall plans

Lakes Region Curling Association members, gathered for the organization’s Annual Meeting on August 31, elected three directors and then listened to a preview of the Fall 2016 season.

Elected to three-year terms on the Board of Directors were Bill Connors, Brian Gately, and Susan Goodwin. Connors and Gately were already serving on the board after being appointed by directors last winter to terms ending at the Annual Meeting. 

Director Mike Turner explained to those in attendance that the Fall league will feature a 20-minute warmup period before each match begins. In addition, he said, teams will have 10 minutes after the final buzzer to complete any unfinished ends. 

The Fall season will run for 10 consecutive Sundays, starting on October 16. There will be no break for Thanksgiving weekend. A learn-to-curl and practice session for members will be held on Friday, Oct. 14, at 5:30 p.m. The event will also serve as a trial run for this year’s setup activities.

Turner also told members that the LRCA is revising its logo, which will be revealed to the organization as the Fall season approaches. 

Members also learned that Mike Spence, who had served the organization as an incorporator and president over the past year, is stepping down from the board. He received a solid round of applause for his contributions to the LRCA’s success.

LRCA Annual Meeting set for Wednesday, Aug. 31

The Lakes Region Curling Association holds its Annual Meeting on Wednesday, Aug. 31, at 7 p.m. in the meeting room of the Wolfeboro Public Library. All members registered for the 2015-2106 membership year, which runs from Sept. 1, 2015, to Aug. 31, 2016, is eligible to attend and participate.

The meeting provides members with an opportunity to fill vacancies on the Board of Directors and to receive updates on the organization’s finances as well as the upcoming Fall curling schedule.

Members are also encouraged to ask questions and offer suggestions for operation of the LRCA’s curling leagues.

LRCA directors are strongly encouraging all current members to attend this year’s meeting and to actively help steer the organization into its second year.

LRCA sets schedule for Fall 2016 season

The Lakes Region Curling Association has set the schedule for its Fall 2016 season. As in the previous year, all curling matches are set for Sunday evening at Pop Whalen Ice Arena in Wolfeboro. Matches are set to begin at 5:15, with a 15-to-20-minute warm-up/practice period preceding. 

One change from last year’s schedule is that matches are scheduled for the Sunday of Thanksgiving weekend, thereby avoiding the need to play on two evenings in a row — Sunday and Monday — at a later time to make up for the lost date.

Dates for Fall 2016 matches are available here.

LRCA sets curling information session for July 20

If you’ve admired and enjoyed watching the graceful Olympic sport that is curling, you now have a chance to try it out._DSC1808

The sport of curling, rapidly growing in New Hampshire, arrived in the Lakes Region in 2015 with the formation of the Lakes Region Curling Association. After highly successful leagues in Fall 2015 and Winter 2016, the LRCA  is holding an informational session for potential new members on Wednesday, July 20, at the Wolfeboro Public Library in preparation for a 10-week curling league that will start in October at Pop Whalen Arena in Wolfeboro.

LRCA curling experiences are designed for participants all ages, for men and women, and for people of varied abilities.

The July 8 session starts at 7 p.m. and will offer an overview of the game of curling, display some of the equipment used in game play, and present information about how the local fall league will operate.IMG_4392

Members of the public from throughout the Lakes Region are encouraged to attend, hear organizers discuss the upcoming program, and ask questions about the sport.

Participants in the LRCA’s fall league will be free to organize their own teams of four to six members (game play will allow team members to rotate into a game), but organizers will also create teams for individuals who do not have one already formed.

A game of curling consists of two four-member teams, with each team “throwing” (that is, sliding) eight polished granite stones toward a bulls-eye target known as “the house.” A game consists of six to ten “ends” (think of them as innings) during which players on the two teams alternate delivering stones towards the house.

While most of us are familiar with the classic sliding delivery in curling, players may also throw their stones using a special push stick that enables the player to walk towards the delivery point and slide a stone without the need to stoop._DSC1733

This makes the game accessible to people of varied skill levels and physical abilities.

In each end, points are allocated to the team whose stones come to rest closest to the center of the house. A team is allowed to hit the opposing team’s stones in order to move them away from the center of the house. Consequently, curling, which has been described as “chess on ice,” is a game of strategy as well as dexterity.

Started in Scotland in medieval times, curling came to the United States and Canada with Scottish immigrants in the 19th century. While it has been popular in Canada for decades, the game started to explode in popularity in the US after the last winter Olympics.

More information about the sport is available on this site’s learning page.