Team 9 takes the Winter 2020 championship as LRCA ends its fifth year on a sober note

Keith Lion, Blaise Masse, and Doc Dougherty were part of the Winter 2020 championship team.

Team 9 — consisting of Dave Alessandroni, Dan Barnard, Doc Dougherty, Keith Lion, and Blaise Masse — took the Winter 2020 league championship in convincing manner even as the season came to an abrupt halt with the closing of Pop Whalen arena because of Covid-19 fears.

The LRCA was forced to cancel matches for its final week, as well as calling off its end-of-year gathering and awards presentation. It was a sobering end to what was an otherwise outstanding year as the association marked its fifth year of operation with a final surge of new curlers in the winter season.

Team 9 ended the season with an admirable 7-1 record, with its only loss coming on February 9 to Irish Claddaghs, 7-6. While Team 9 played all eight of its scheduled matches, the outcome of the championship race was a foregone conclusion even before the final week’s cancelled contests.

The Winter 2020 season was unusual in that the predictable membership fall-off during the cold months was more than offset by an influx of new curlers, necessitating the fielding of nine teams and the use of a bye week for each squad.

With the end of the winter league, the LRCA completed its fifth year of operation bringing curling to the Lakes Region of New Hampshire. A venture that started with the tentative hopes of the five original organizers — Mike Spence, Bud Booth, Hugh Crawford, Carl Crosley, and Rich Masse — took off on the enthusiasm around the impending 2018 Winter Olympics.

Over the years the organization has reached and recruited curling enthusiasts from around the Lakes Region and beyond. Now, with preparations and trials for the 2022 Winter Olympics scheduled to start in 2021, the new year promises a new surge of interest and involvement, and LRCA organizers will be at work over the summer months working on how to get the word out even more about this growing sport.

Dave Alessandroni
Dan Barnard


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Wolfeboro Winter Carnival will feature curling open house on Sunday, February 23

Have you found yourself scrolling television channels late in the day and stumbling on a curling match in progress – and have you maybe lingered, mystified by the way a large granite stone can travel a hundred feet with pinpoint accuracy, steered by madly shouting sweepers? Do you know someone who plays on a curling team and is endlessly enthusiastic about the competition, the strategy, and the teamwork?

If so, here’s your chance to find out what the fuss is all about.

Again this year Wolfeboro Winter Carnival, sponsored by the Department of Parks and Recreation, will feature a curling open house at Pop Whalen Ice Arena. The session, which is set for Sunday, Feb. 23, at 2:15 p.m., is free and open to the public.

Members of the Lakes Region Curling Association will be on hand to provide an overview of the game of curling and to offer participants an opportunity to learn scoring and curling skills. Instructions will include an opportunity to try the classic sliding delivery of the curling stone as well as a standing delivery using a specially designed “delivery stick.”

Participants are asked to bring a pair of clean-soled shoes – athletic shoes work well — that they can change into at the rink in order to protect the ice surface from grit and de-icing chemicals found on walkways and parking lots.

For more information about the Olympic sport of curling in general and Lakes Region Curling in particular, see the remainder of this site.

LRCA and Parks offer learn-to-curl classes

Lakes Region Curling and the Wolfeboro Department of Parks and Recreation are again partnering to offer a four-week learn-to-curl class on Wednesday mornings during February.

The program, which is currently registering participants, is open to members of the public who have from zero to two years of curling experience. Sessions will take place on February 5, 12, 19, and 26.

Each weekly class will start at 9:30 a.m. and last an hour and a half. Experienced LRCA curlers will be on hand to provide coaching and organize matches among participants.

Cost of the program is $60.

For information and to register, visit the Parks and Rec web site. Click “Register Now”, then search for “curling,” and finally click “Register” for Learn To Curl–Session 2 on the form.

You will need to have or create an account on the Parks web site to access the registration form.

Fall league sees upstarts make their move

For the last night of the Fall season, curlers joined randomly assigned teams to add a challenge to the evening’s events. Here Denise Cogswell of Wolf Pack prepares to sweep a stone for Dave Alessandroni of Team Nine while Barbara Mosley of On the Rocks awaits her turn.

The Fall 2019 league brought in better than a half-dozen new curlers to already-established teams, and it didn’t take long for the newcomers to make their presence felt.

Both Rock Stars and Team Nine, with three new curlers apiece, as well as a reconstituted Curlin’ Curlers, with newcomer Sharon Greene on board, racked up impressive records, either challenging for top billing or taking down more experienced squads over the course of the season.

Anne Lavin of Rolling Stones displays the curling stone sugar cookies that she baked — after creating the mold for them.

On Team Nine it was veterans Blaise Masse (skip) and Dave Alessandroni teaming up with Keith Lion, Jim McIntyre, and Doc Dougherty. The squad posted a 4-1-2 record and took a close second place in league standings.

Rock Stars, skipped by Chris Johnson with experienced help from Nancy Damboise, was manned by Anne Lavin and John Rochlis of Gilford along with Lily Chalsma, the youngest member of the LRCA. The team knocked On the Rocks from the top of the standings in the last week of regulation play, opening the way for Wolf Pack to take top honors once again.

It’s clear, though, that the competition is getting hotter. Final standings are found here.

The season closed out with the traditional awards get-together at Bayside Grille & Bar in Wolfeboro.

Registration is now under way for the Winter 2020 season, which runs for eight weeks from January 12 to March 8. There is no curling on Super Bowl Sunday, February 2.

The Fall 2019 championship went to Wolf Pack members Shirley Alessandroni, Sue Bennett, Eileen Neal, and Denise Cogswell.

 

Registration starts for Winter league

Registration has started for Lakes Region Curling’s Winter 2020 league. The season consists of eight Sunday matches, starting on January 12 and running until March 8. No matches are scheduled for February 2, Super Bowl weekend.

Each match, held at Pop Whalen Ice Arena in Wolfeboro, runs for two hours, starting at 5:15 p.m.

The LRCA will offer new players a learn-to-curl session on Sunday, January 5, during which experienced curlers provide instruction in the rules and game play of the sport.

Registration is open to men and women aged 14 or over. No previous experience is required, and participants may join as individuals, with a partner, or as part of a complete team. All equipment is provided, and organizers will assist unaffiliated registrants in finding a team.

Registration fee is $195 per person. Registration forms as well as waiver forms for adults and for minors are available for download from this site.

Sometimes referred to as “chess on ice,” curling originated on the marshes of Scotland in the early 1500s and came to North America with British colonists in the 18th century. First demonstrated at the 1926 Winter Olympics, it became an official Olympic sport in 1998.


 

LTC class draws 13 future curlers

A collaborative effort between Lakes Region Curling Association and the Wolfeboro Parks and Recreation Department drew a small crowd of curling hopefuls on November 6. The event marked the first session of a four-week learn-to-curl class offered for Lakes Region residents who have from zero to two years of curling experience. The program aims to take the 13 registered participants from the basics of the sport up to high-level skills such as reading the ice and developing offensive and defensive strategies. The hope is that the program, which will be offered again in January and February, can become a feeder system for the LRCA’s regular Fall and Winter leagues. LRCA members providing coaching and support for the effort were Hugh Crawford, Carl and Judy Crosley, Dan Barnard, Wayne McBride, Andrea Dudley, and Rich Masse.


 

LRCA and Wolfeboro Parks and Rec to host four-week learn-to-curl class this Fall

Lakes Region Curling and the Wolfeboro Department of Parks and Recreation are partnering to offer a four-week learn-to-curl class on Wednesday mornings starting in November.

The program, which is currently registering participants, is open to members of the public who have from zero to two years of curling experience. Sessions will take place on November 6, 13, and 20 as well as December 4. (No class during Thanksgiving week.)

Each weekly class will start at 10 a.m. and last about an hour. Experienced LRCA curlers will be on hand to provide coaching and organize matches among participants.

Cost of the program is $60.

For information and to register, visit the Parks and Rec web site. Click “Register Now”, then search for “curling,” and finally click “Register” for Session 1 on the form.

You will need to have or create an account on the Parks web site to access the registration form.

Registration is under way for our Fall league

Registration is now open for Lakes Region Curling’s Fall 2019 season. The league will mark the start of the association’s fifth year of bringing Olympic sport to the region.

Running from mid-October to mid-December, the Fall season offers eight weekly curling matches at Pop Whalen Ice Arena in Wolfeboro. Matches take place from 5:15 to 7:15 pm on Sunday evenings.

 A pre-season learn-to-curl session will be scheduled for early October.

For men and women of all ages and fitness levels, curling is a sport that combines skill, teamwork, and strategy. With that in mind, LRCA matches put a premium on friendly competition, sportsmanship, and fun.

Players can register singly, with a partner, or as full teams of four to six players. LRCA organizers will find teams for those who are not already affiliated.

No previous experience is needed, and the association provides all necessary equipment.

The $195 registration fee defrays the cost of ice time, equipment, and insurance.

To register, download and complete both a registration form and a waiver form and send them, with payment, to:

Lakes Region Curling Association
P.O. Box 606
Wolfeboro Falls, NH 03896

For more information about the upcoming curling league, send a message to info@lakescurlingnh.org.


 

Wolf Pack three-peats with Winter 2019 win

The team of Eileen Neal, Shirley Alessandroni, Denise Cogswell, and Sue Bennett — collectively the Wolf Pack — became the first group to win three LRCA seasonal championships when they took top spot in the Winter 2019 season. 

The team also won the Winter 2016 and Fall 2018 seasons. 

The foursome also plays at Ham Arena in North Conway under the auspices of the Mount Washington Valley Curling Club, although Denise is affiliated with a different team there. They are also involved in curling competition at Plymouth State University.

Learn-to-curl session set for February 26

As part of Wolfeboro Parks and Recreation’s annual Winter Carnival, Lakes Region Curling Association will hold a free learn-to-curl session for members of the public on Tuesday, Feb. 26, at Pop Whalen Ice Arena, Route 109A, in Wolfeboro. Aimed at people 14 years of age and older, the event will begin at 2 p.m., with registration starting at 1:45.


Curlers should bring a pair of athletic shoes with clean soles that they can put on at the arena. All other equipment is provided.

For men and women of all ages and fitness levels, curling is a sport that combines skill, teamwork, and strategy. LRCA matches put a premium on friendly competition, sportsmanship, and fun. LRCA members will be on hand during the learn-to-curl session to explain the rules of the sport and to provide instruction in basic skills such as stone delivery and sweeping.

Now an Olympic sport with a growing following in the US, curling began on the frozen marshes of Scotland during the Middle Ages. It was brought to North America during the 18th century and is played throughout Canada and the Upper Midwest.